Is it possible that we are in fact descendants of wolves?

if you want to answer me quickly above is the simple question, if you are interested in thinking a bit more or using up a bit more time than please read my reasoning below to further understand the question. If you know anyone who could explain it to me better than you can please don’t hesitate to pass on the question.

Okay so I am really interested in behavioral science and the like and that has led me to the study of wolves and the pack mentality they exhibit, the pack mentality I have noticed can be applied to human social interactions successfully to the point that I am starting to think there is a connection. My question is is it possible that we are in fact descendants of wolves? I know the common belief is that we evolved from apes and I see why people believe that but maybe we are not descendant of but one animal. It is my current belief that if we were in fact descendant of wolves than under the guidance of evolution our snouts have retracted because of the lack of use and our teeth blunted from our omnivore eating pattern. I know that behind our ears we have the dormant equipment needed to move our ears (likely used when we had to hunt to survive). humans also sometimes demonstrate the same extent of situational awareness a wolf does, a wolf can tell a dying elk from over 20 miles away, a human baby can tell the exact instant a mum leaves the home and loved ones have been known to breakdown when there partner has died without any way of knowing they have in fact died. There is so much evidence it seems overwhelming, I can continue but I already fell like I am wasting your time so again I state the question:
is it possible that we are in fact descendants of wolves?

Afraid not.  There's no evidence at all that we are descended from wolves.

There is a wonderful fossil record of transitional forms towards humans (see here: http://www.palaeontologyonline.com/arti … al-apes/), and genetic evidence indicates humans and apes are most closely related.

Many of the factors you mention are either anecdotal or equally applicable to apes.

Agreed the genetic data is now incontrovertible - our direct ancestors were apes.

Quoth David:

Agreed the genetic data is now incontrovertible - our direct ancestors were apes.

The case was pretty much incontrovertible even before the genetic data were available, to be honest. The evidence from the anatomy, physiology and behaviour of living primates, combined with the fossil record, points overwhelmingly to an ape ancestor.

Quoth Peter:

Many of the factors you mention are either anecdotal or equally applicable to apes.

I think this is the key point in this discussion. To expand on it a little, the similarities between wolves and humans mentioned in the original question are mostly real (though I'm sceptical about the one involving long-distance knowledge of dying elks, dying partners and departing mothers). For example, humans and wolves are both social animals, so they do indeed have very broadly similar "pack mentalities". However, chimpanzees and gorillas are social animals too, so this characteristic can't be used to argue that wolves are more likely to be closely related to humans than apes are. To determine whether this might be the case we need to look at characteristics that differ between wolves and apes, and with respect to those features humans are almost without exception more similar to apes than wolves. Apes and humans, for example, have hands that bear fingernails and can be readily used to manipulate objects, whereas wolves have forepaws that bear claws and are mostly for use in walking and running.